2018-10-20 Horszowski Trio

Dear friends,

Two years ago when the HORSZOWSKI TRIO last appeared on our stage, music-lovers were rapturous and told us that they “… loved this Trio.” “They made me feel full of life.” “The whole audience was visibly moved.”

Their Beethoven Trio No. 2 in G major “…was so tender and emotional and textured”. “It brought tears to my eyes.” Many patrons remarked on their “amazing performance” of the Shostakovich Trio No. 2 in E minor – “…a profoundly moving piece on the brokenness of the time.” “The depth of feeling and emotions was riveting.”

“This was not just a super concert, it was an event, a very special event!”

No wonder the New Yorker magazine called the Trio – “The most compelling American group to come on the scene.” Their concerts are “memorably monumental” (Los Angeles Times).

To recapture the magic of that evening, the Horszowski Trio returns to Virtuosi Concerts to perform Schumann, Haydn and Mendelssohn. The musicians wrote to us to describe their artistic vision for this Virtuosi concert:

“Our program is bookended by monumental works composed within two years of each other by close friends, Robert Schumann and Felix Mendelssohn. Schumann’s Piano Trio in D minor comes from a troubled period in his life, and this is clear from the very first note. It surges and storms, gallops and dreams, broods and yearns, breaking rules of structure and instrumental writing (the strings even play on the bridge at one point), attempting to find peace, and ultimately, in the last movement, redemption.

Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio in C minor follows a similar path from turbulence to absolution (a chorale evoking a Lutheran hymn even takes over the finale), but the style of the writing is notably different. Gone is Schumann’s searing and heartbreaking rawness. Each movement shines like an architectural jewel. We are moved by the glory of the composition, which, like a meticulously-crafted novel, leads us to a spellbinding conclusion.

In between these epics we have, as a sparking palate cleanser, a work by the man who started it all, Franz Josef Haydn.  His Piano Trio in G major is famous for its gypsy style in the last movement, and the piece is light and fun throughout. Perhaps Haydn was thinking of his mistress, the work’s dedicatee, when he wrote the achingly beautiful melodies of the slow movement.”

To see a live performance of the Horszowski Trio performing the Brahms Trio No. 3 in C minor, Op. 101, CLICK HERE

And opening the concert, as part of our Young Artist Program will be Sawyer Craig, soprano, and Megan Dufrat, piano.

 

See you Saturday!